scishow
scishow:

explainers-nysci:


Autumn equinox is arriving on September 23, 2014 at 2:29 (UTC). You can check the exact time in your area from here!
The autumn equinox is when the Earth has almost no tilt on its axis in regards to the sun. This means that both hemispheres of the Earth receive approximately the same amount of sunlight. You’ll notice that on equinox days, night and day are almost equal in length! 
Get ready for sweater weather and foliage!
Source


Lots of people seem to get confused about what exactly an equinox is, so we made a video explaining the real deal. 

scishow:

explainers-nysci:

Autumn equinox is arriving on September 23, 2014 at 2:29 (UTC). You can check the exact time in your area from here!

The autumn equinox is when the Earth has almost no tilt on its axis in regards to the sun. This means that both hemispheres of the Earth receive approximately the same amount of sunlight. You’ll notice that on equinox days, night and day are almost equal in length! 

Get ready for sweater weather and foliage!

Source

Lots of people seem to get confused about what exactly an equinox is, so we made a video explaining the real deal

scishow

scishow:

thebrainscoop:

thecrashcourse:

The Big Bang: Crash Course Big History #1

In which John Green, Hank Green, and Emily Graslie teach you about, well, everything. Big History is the history of everything. We’re going to start with the Big Bang, take you right through all of history (recorded and otherwise), and even talk a little bit about the future. It is going to be awesome. In the awe-inspiring sense of the word awesome. In this episode, we walk you through the start of everything: The Big Bang. We’ll look at how the universe unfolded at its very beginning, and how everything in the universe that we know today came into being. So that’s kind of a big deal, right?

For more information, visit www.bighistoryproject.com

So… this is a big announcement!

The Big History Project is what I would have loved to experience in my high school classroom. It contextualizes… everything. Instead of putting up arbitrary barriers around subjects, it encourages participants to approach history - history of science, math, the earth, our solar system, civilization - in the only way we can begin to make sense of it all, which is through relational context. 

And I’m really, really proud to announce that I’ve got a few minor guest hosting roles throughout the series! It’s a big honor to be asked to participate and serve as Scientific Claims Tester. Plus I got to hang out in the Crash Course studio like whaaaaaaaat

This is gonna be good. Life! The universe! Everything!